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Several tips for buying a used car

It is recorded on Wapcar.my that some used car models still prevail among customers, such as Toyota Vios second hand. So you were looking to buy yourself a car and ultimately decided to go the used route instead of the new one after weighing the pros and cons. The next thing is to find a used car that not only appeals to you but also meets all the requirements you have listed in your head.

From hatchbacks and sedans to SUVs and even luxury two-door coupes, the used car market is full of options to suit every budget. It’s really a “the world is your oyster” case, but like seashells, not every old car you come across leaves a good feeling in your stomach after you put your name on it. dotted line.

Potential problems can appear right after your first purchase, and they can be financially taxing, offsetting what you think you’ll save versus buying new. Luckily, we’re here to help with some tips on what to look out for when buying a used car, and when combined with some assessment and homework on your part, you can avoid falling into the money pit.

Know what you really need
So you were looking to buy yourself a car and ultimately decided to go the used route instead of new after weighing the pros and cons. The next thing is to find a used car that not only appeals to you but also meets all the requirements you have listed in your head.

From hatchbacks and sedans to SUVs and even luxury two-door coupes, the used car market is full of options to suit every budget. It’s really a “the world is your oyster” case, but like seashells, not every old car you come across leaves a good feeling in your stomach after you put your name on it. dotted line.

Potential problems can appear right after your first purchase, and they can be financially taxing, offsetting what you think you’ll save versus buying new. Luckily, we’re here to help with some tips on what to look out for when buying a used car, and when combined with some assessment and homework on your part, you can avoid falling into the money pit.

Consider other factors beyond the price tag
The budget you set determines the used cars you can afford, that’s for sure. Take enough time to shop around and you’ll soon realize you can buy something exotic for the same amount as something a little more ordinary.

It’s certainly tempting, but practice some discipline and ask yourself if you can afford to properly service your new car. Maintenance costs can vary widely from domestic cars to continental cars, so do your research to find out how much it will cost to keep your new car up and running.

You will always need to spend a little extra on the maintenance costs of any used car, but how much is too much? Can you afford to replace a major Porsche or Ferrari part? If you shake your head, you probably can’t afford to maintain a used one, even if it doesn’t exceed your purchase budget.

The temptation is everywhere and it increases if you come across a used car that is “below market value”. It sounds good, but you can spend more than you imagine to get it back in top condition and that doesn’t even include time and effort. Spending a bit more on a well-maintained instance with a full maintenance history might be worth it in the long run.

Other financial issues include the amount of road tax you’ll have to pay each year, which doesn’t change with the age of your car, as well as the higher interest rate old cars attract than new cars.

Check the exterior
After all the verbal discussions, it’s time to see the car you hope will be your next. The vehicle inspection process is the next important step in the used car buying process, but remember that you still can’t buy if you see something you don’t like.

To see the whole car, check the papers first. Do the chassis and engine number, color, year of manufacture and registration match what is stated on the registration card? If the details are verified, we move on to the next step: external inspection. Note any scratches, dents, paint defects, and the quality of any repairs that the dealer or previous owner may have performed. Also, check the clearances between the plates for sturdiness, as uneven gaps can be a sign of a previous fender bend or poor-quality bodywork due to an accident. problem.

Don’t just hit the tires. Identify the brand used, as cheap tires suggest a cost-cutting approach. While you’re at it, find out the year the tires were made to make sure they’re not too old, although it’s always a good idea to swap in a new set of tires if the car has been in storage for a while. because the tire may have hardened or deflated while idling. Also, check the wheels for curb damage, and if they’re OEM or aftermarket, beware of their fake versions.

Some cars produce them with factory-installed body kits, while others are retrofitted. The add-on kits are sometimes fixed in a way that leaves permanent holes in the bodywork, so this is another thing to watch out for. If replacement body panels are available, be sure to find out if they are OEM or counterfeit as they can be made from different materials.

As a general rule, look for cars in stock or in original condition with little or no modifications, if possible, unless the modified vehicle you’re considering has modifications or looks to match. match your preferences.

Check the interior
While it’s relatively easier to tweak the exterior of a car, the interior takes a little more work. As such, a taxi valuation will tell you the story of a car’s condition better because that’s where the previous owner spent a lot of time. If there are things that are too worn, replacing them will incur an additional fee.

Frequent contact points are the most susceptible to abrasion, so check for tears in fabric seats, hard/shiny/cracked leather seats, heavily scratched steering wheel, and worn door handles/handles as well. like climate and audio controls. You’ll also want to watch out for broken parts like switches, which can be difficult to replace, and cigarette smells. Take the time to inspect the floor and boot mats for wet spots that indicate standing water, as well as rust on the seat bolts and base which indicates leaks or even a flood that causes great damage. Finally, make sure all electronics are working properly, including the central locking, rearview camera, infotainment, screens, power seats and more.

Items with mechanisms such as seat belts must also retract and not sag, as safety is not compromised. Power sunroofs and sunroofs (convertibles) can also work without problems as they have more complex components and can be expensive.

The test drive
Finally, it’s time to go hiking in your new pride and joy. Before that, open the hood and check the engine compartment for any signs of oil or fluid leaks or any sign of either. It’s fair to not expect the engine bay to be spotlessly clean, but the mechanical components should be in good condition.

Start the engine and listen to make sure it’s idling smoothly, without causing choking noises or excessive vibrations in the cabin. Give the motor a spin and make sure it also returns to a smooth idling state afterward. The essential air conditioner must also function properly with a well-functioning compressor to provide cool air without any odors. Also, make sure that there is airflow from all the vents and make sure you can adjust them and other functions such as recirculation, airflow direction and temperature setting airflow work.

On the road, relax and get used to the car. There’s no need to step on the accelerator because it doesn’t tell you much about how the car behaves in slow traffic and that’s not how most people drive every day.

Focus on the engine and transmission to determine if they’re running smoothly, and test the steering to make sure it doesn’t vibrate too much or pull too much to the side. The suspension should also not have any creaking or squeaking, which could indicate that it is worn or running low and may need to be replaced. Interior trouble is a possibility but not unsurprising for used cars, though new cars are not exempt either – it’s up to you to decide if that’s acceptable. .

Plus, learn about the functions and controls available, and if you insist on ‘Italian tuning’, do so in a safe environment where you won’t let other drivers get risk. Remember though, it’s still not your car and the “when broken, considered sold” law should apply if you cause damage during a test drive.

If you’re not sure how you feel, consider asking a friend or even a trusted mechanic to evaluate the vehicle for you. A second opinion is always welcome, and if the dealer hesitated, you might have dodged a bullet.

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