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Opera’s crypto browser is now available on iOSThe Morning After: MIT engineers’ stroke-surgery robot

Don’t worry, yes, there are even more Musk machinations, but first let’s broach something a little different — and possibly lifesaving. A team of MIT engineers is developing a telerobotic system for neurosurgeons. It unveiled a robotic arm that doctors can control remotely using a modified joystick to treat stroke patients.

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The arm has a magnet attached to its wrist, and surgeons can adjust its orientation to guide a magnetic wire through the patient’s arteries and vessels to remove blood clots in the brain. Like in-person procedures, surgeons will have to rely on live imaging to get to the blood clot, but the machine means they don’t have to be physically with the patient.

Elon Musk has offered to buy Twitter for $43 billion, telling the SEC in a filing that the deal would be good for free speech. “I invested in Twitter as I believe in its potential to be the platform for free speech around the globe, and I believe free speech is a societal imperative for a functioning democracy,” he wrote. If the deal goes through, Musk plans to take the company private.

It was another busy day for Musk: He held a TED talk where he said he wants Twitter’s algorithm to be open source. And hopefully the final Twitter–Musk headline for the week: The Tesla boss is no longer the biggest shareholder of Twitter. At least, for now.

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