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Mental health and living abroad: New data reveals the most common pitfalls

Studying or working abroad is a fantastic experience for many, offering new experiences and perspectives. However, it can also provide significant challenges, especially with regards to wellbeing and mental health.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Many people experience significant challenges to their general wellbeing and mental health when moving to – and living in – another country. This can take many forms, such as:

Difficulty accessing medication, particularly medication prescribed in the previous country of residence.
Not being able to navigate the local health system to book an appointment.
Not being able to find the right ingredients for a vegan or vegetarian diet.
In partnership with AXA Global Healthcare, we take a look at some of the major issues facing international professionals, as well as what can be done to look after health and general wellbeing as an expat.

Difficulties faced

Having moved to Berlin from Saudi Arabia to study and work in HR, Hanan Asgar was excited about the opportunities Germany offered. As she says: “I wanted freedom, respect and equality for myself and my generation.”

However, the combination of being completely new in a foreign country, together with an unfortunate incident in her first few days in her new homeland – about which Hanan had no one to speak to – meant that Hanan began to feel isolated and anxious.

She tells us: “My anxiety grew and I actually ended up locking myself in my dorm room and questioning my choice of moving to Germany. But after some reflection, I realised that it was me who was missing out on the lectures I was avoiding. So I took the courage to step out again and face what was to come.”

Living and working abroad, far from home, can present a number of obstacles. Learn more about how AXA provides mental health and wellbeing healthcare as part of its global health plans

Hanan subsequently underwent treatment for anxiety and depression with a therapist, and has now been living happily in Berlin for the past six years.

Hanan’s experience with initial culture shock and mental health challenges, while living and working abroad, is shared by many expats. A social listening study conducted by AXA* in 2021, across six popular nations or regions for those living abroad, discovered:

Anxiety was the most common difficulty faced by expats in France, the Scandinavian countries and the United Kingdom – 24%, 27% and 32% respectively.
Depression was the second most commonly experienced challenge.
Those in France were most likely to experience anxiety and depression regarding the consequences of Brexit.
Other issues that those in France, Scandinavia and the United Kingdom identified as obstacles associated with living abroad, included dealing with chronic illness (such as living with a condition like diabetes), safety concerns (for example, crime) and stress related to the workplace.

Strategies that work

Fortunately, the AXA study also shows that there are a number of strategies that work when dealing with health and general wellbeing issues. Their study found the following:

Building strong support networks and healthy relationships with friends and co-workers was seen as important by expats in all countries.
Building strong support networks, as well as spending time on entertainment and hobbies, were particularly important to those living in the United Kingdom.
Exercise – outdoor, or in a gym – was particularly helpful to those in Scandinavia and France, while those in France reported that they had also had specific success with mindfulness practice and good nutrition.
The most effective and useful strategy that AXA discovered, however, was proactive and preventative healthcare, such as accessing a GP or qualified psychologist.
Discover more ways to look after mind and body while living abroad with AXA and their Mind Health Service

Seeking out the right health professionals for both body and mind can significantly reduce the levels of anxiety and depression experienced by those living abroad. Regular check-ups can prevent conditions becoming chronic, while discussing mental health and wellbeing can substantially reduce the pressure that many feel. Prevention, as the saying goes, is better than cure.

Ensuring you have the right healthcare

Finding the right health professionals abroad can be difficult due to language differences, cultural attitudes and varying levels of healthcare. As Hanan reports of her own experience: “I sought professional help and it was quite challenging to find a therapist who spoke English. It took months just for an initial appointment. In the meantime, I would go to an emergency psychological help centre or ask a friend to be around. It all worked out in the end, but it did take a mental toll on me”.

This is why finding a health insurance provider that offers fast and effective links with health professionals is key. When looking for an insurance plan, consider what AXA has to offer, and the Mind Health Service1 they provide for their customers.

Included with all individual and small business coverage plans, the Mind Health Service provides up to six telephone-based sessions for those covered, in addition to their Virtual Doctor Service2. It’s easy and fast to connect to a qualified psychologist who speaks your language, wherever you are in the world, whenever you need it. There is no extra charge for this service for individual, family or SME customers, it has no impact on your excess and outpatient or policy allowances, and can also be used by anybody who is covered by your plan.

Living abroad is, for many, the experience of a lifetime. The memories and friendships created can endure long after we’ve returned home. That’s why it’s so important to ensure that the care and support is there to ensure you can keep enjoying your new country.

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